FBR SmartBrief Jan 16, 2019 – 2-Antibody Drug Protects Monkeys & Ferrets Against All Strains of Ebola

FBR SmartBrief Jan 16, 2019 – 2-Antibody Drug Protects Monkeys & Ferrets Against All Strains of Ebola

2-antibody drug protects monkeys, ferrets against all strains of Ebola | Treatment studied in NHPs shows promise for protecting humans against ricin | Small non-human primates might yield big clues about Alzheimer’s disease

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January 16, 2019
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2-antibody drug protects monkeys, ferrets against all strains of Ebola

2-antibody drug protects monkeys, ferrets against all strains of Ebola
(John Moore/Getty Images)
A drug that combines two antibodies protected ferrets and monkeys against the Bundibugyo, Sudan and Zaire strains of Ebola virus in a single dose, researchers reported in Cell Host & Microbe. The results suggest the drug would continue to offer protection as the virus evolves, says Thomas Geisbert, a professor at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston.

HealthDay News (1/11)

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Treatment studied in NHPs shows promise for protecting humans against ricin

An experimental agent has shown promise as a lifesaving treatment after exposure to the deadly ricin toxin, according to research from the Tulane National Primate Research Center. The study, conducted in non-human primates, could pave the way for post-exposure and prophylactic treatment of emergency workers to protect against the potential bioterrorism agent.

Tulane University (1/15)

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RESEARCH BREAKTHROUGHS

Small non-human primates might yield big clues about Alzheimer’s disease

Research scientist Anna Casey is studying mouse lemurs at the Duke Lemur Center to learn more about neurodegeneration and Alzheimer’s disease in people. Mouse lemurs’ relatively short life spans and genetic similarity to humans make them excellent study subjects, says Casey, who teaches willing lemurs cognitive tasks.

WRAL-TV (Raleigh, N.C.) (1/14)

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Scientists study ferrets to fight deadly virus carried by invasive tick

Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome, a potentially fatal condition caused by a virus carried by Asian longhorned ticks where they are endemic, interferes with TPL2 gene activity, suppressing the body’s immune response and allowing the virus to proliferate, according to researchers who studied SFTS in ferrets. The findings, published in Nature Microbiology, are helping researchers develop a vaccine, says first author Younho Choi, a development that could combat a serious public health worry as the tick is found in more parts of the US.

R&D Magazine online (1/10)

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Organs-on-a-chip remain functional for 28 days in study

A study published in Advanced Functional Materials demonstrated the potential for organs-on-a-chip to replace animals in some toxicity studies. Scientists developed a system comprising heart, liver, skeletal muscle and nervous system modules that maintained cellular viability and function for 28 days, and they were able to do real-time monitoring of the cells’ electrical and mechanical functions.

Orlando Sentinel (Fla.) (tiered subscription model) (1/14)

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FDA-approved drugs turn invasive cancer cells into fat cells in mice

FDA-approved drugs turn invasive cancer cells into fat cells in mice
(Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
Two FDA-approved drugs — rosiglitazone and trametinib — converted invasive cancer cells from human breast cancer cells implanted in mice into fat cells and halted metastasis, researchers reported in Cancer Cell. If future studies support the findings, the drugs could be added to chemotherapy to suppress tumor growth and the spread of cancer, the researchers said.

LiveScience (1/15)

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ANIMAL HEALTH

Studies in pets might be key to solving obesity puzzle

Studies in pets might be key to solving obesity puzzle
(Pixabay)
Obesity is not a condition unique to humans, as obesity rates are also rising among domestic and some wild animals. Research has found genetic and environmental links to obesity, and ongoing studies of obesity in pets may be key to identifying prevention and treatment strategies across species.

BBC (1/15)

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Researchers identify genetic changes linked to mastocytoma progression

Researchers identified genetic changes that occur as canine cutaneous mast cell tumors spread, and the findings, published in PLOS One, could enable veterinarians to better predict metastasis risk and might lead to the development of new treatments. Mastocytomas also affect people, and researcher Mike Starkey says anything scientists discover about canine cancer furthers understanding of the corresponding cancer in humans.

East Anglian Daily Times (UK) (1/11)

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Multidisciplinary veterinary team pioneers pituitary surgery

Veterinary neurologist Annie Chen-Allen, critical care veterinarian Linda Martin and veterinary surgeon Tina Owen perform an average of one transsphenoidal hypophysec­tomy, or pituitary tumor removal, each month. Not all cases are candidates for surgery, but success rates are particularly high with small tumors, and surgery can also reduce the animal’s risk for uncontrollable diabetes.

American Veterinarian (1/11)

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2019-01-17T10:49:37-04:00